February Monthly Roundup

Mayors around the country are increasingly concerned as the EPA finalizes their rules to address PFAS in drinking water. Federal funding to local municipalities is not enough, and residents will be left footing the bill. Read more about the challenges cities are facing as they grapple with expensive, unfunded mandates.

January Monthly Roundup

Last month, the Water and Health Advisory Council attended the United States Conference of Mayors Annual Winter Meeting. The three-day conference consisted of informative panel discussions among local elected officials and thought leaders throughout the nation. Council Member Chad Seidel spoke to the growing concerns surrounding the EPA’s proposed PFAS drinking water regulations, urging decision-makers to apply the cost-benefit approach as we evaluate new policies resulting in unfunded mandates.

December Monthly Roundup

In his piece for Water Finance & Management, Council member Chad Seidel discusses the recently released drinking water quality testing data and calls into question the major assumptions underpinning the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) proposed National Drinking Water Standards for PFOA and PFOS.
Check out the article to learn more about how these oversights by the agency could impact the public health benefits and costs of the EPA’s proposed PFAS drinking water rule.

November Monthly Roundup

As one of the most populous cities in the United States with an extremely dry climate, Phoenix, Arizona has been falsely characterized as doomed to run out of water. However, this narrative could not be farther from the truth. In their piece in the Wall Street Journal, Council Member Kathryn Sorenson and co-author Sarah Porter dispel the myths about water in Phoenix and explain how population growth in the city actually makes more water available to residents.

October Monthly Roundup

As one of the most populous cities in the United States with an extremely dry climate, Phoenix, Arizona has been falsely characterized as doomed to run out of water. However, this narrative could not be farther from the truth. In their piece in the Wall Street Journal, Council Member Kathryn Sorenson and co-author Sarah Porter dispel the myths about water in Phoenix and explain how population growth in the city actually makes more water available to residents.

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